Rosh Hashanah and the Feast of Trumpets in Ancient Israel

Ro’sh Hashshanah (literally, “head of the year”) the Hebrew new year, ushered in the Feast of Trumpets with the blowing of the ram’s horn. It was the first of the high holy feast days and looked forward to the solemn Day of Atonement which occurred ten days later.

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The Feast of Pentecost in Ancient Israel

Pentecost, which means “fifty,” is celebrated fifty days after Passover. It is the only one of the three pilgrimage feasts which did not commemorate a specific event in Israel’s history. Eventually it came to be associated with the giving of the Law at Mount Sinai.

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The Feast of Passover and The Feast of Unleavened Bread in Ancient Israel

The Feast of Passover commemorated the Lord’s deliverance of Israel in Exodus. The Feast of Unleavened Bread, which followed it, kept alive the memory of the affliction of the Israelites and their haste in departing from the land of bondage.

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Sabbath and Sabbatical Seasons in Ancient Israel

The word sabbath means a time of rest. In Israelite and Jewish religion, times of rest are the weekly Sabbath, the monthly new moon, the sabbatical year, the Year of Jubilee, and special festal Sabbaths. Sabbaths were times of release from the economic bondage of heavy work or constant indebtedness; they were declarations that the needs of the people were supplied not by their labor but by the Lord.

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