Evidence for the Origin of Daily Prayer

The early Christians continued the Jewish practice of praying at mealtimes and at set hours of the day. The Didachē, a primitive Christian manual of instruction, prescribes prayer three times a day; Clement of Alexandria and Origen in the third century refer to a similar custom in Egypt, as well as to prayer in the night. At the same period in North Africa, however, Tertullian and Cyprian describe a more extensive pattern of daily prayer.

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Prayer and Teaching of the Disciples

Prayer and the Divine providence are closely related. They stand in close companionship. They cannot possibly be separated. So closely connected are they that to deny one is to abolish the other. Prayer supposes providence, while providence is the result of and belongs to prayer. All answers to prayer are but the intervention of the providence of God in the affairs of His people. Providence has to do specially with praying people. Prayer, providence and the Holy Spirit are a trinity, which cooperate with each other and are in perfect harmony with one another. Prayer is but the request of men and women for God through the Holy Spirit to interfere on behalf of those who pray. (Adapted from E.M. Bounds, The Necessity of Prayer)

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